Friday, October 24, 2008

Hypocrisy Watch: Lefties Finance Campaign Finance Ads Against McConnell, McCain, But Ignore Obama's Disdain For Spending Limits And Regulations

We knew this was coming: Moveon.org and its friends are pumping hundreds of thousands of dollars into a new ad campaign against Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, on the heels of a similar ad attacking Senator John McCain. The LA Times blog reports:

Campaign Money Watch, the group that bills itself as a nonpartisan advocate for campaign finance reform, is attacking Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell.

The Washington-based group is spending almost $400,000 on the attack, which includes a tough new television ad and website.

In filing with the Federal Election Commission, Campaign Money Watch disclosed a new batch of donors paying for the attack on the Kentucky senator. Its biggest contributor was the liberal online advocacy group, MoveOn.org, which gave $400,000.

Campaign Money Watch received $130,000 from billionaire Jerome Kohlberg, a founder of the private equity firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., and $30,000 from Communication Workers of America.

Campaign Money Watch's parent group describes itself as a "nonprofit, nonpartisan organization dedicated to improving America’s campaign finance laws."

Previously, Campaign Money Watch attacked John McCain, who co-wrote the current campaign McCain-Feingold finance law.

Isn't it ironic that McCain -- the one member of Congress whom so-called "campaign finance reformers" should love -- was attacked on this issue?

We are not holding our breath waiting for this so-called "nonpartisan organization" to launch an ad campaign against Senator Obama for willfully breaking his pledge to comply with public financing requirements and fundraising limitations. No doubt the money men from Moveon.org, KKR and the union would object.

1 comment:

BurrDeming said...

Actually, Obama expressed interest in McCain's proposal to jointly limit expenditures and would demand that Democratic 527s limit theirs, if McCain would demand of Republican 527s that they follow suit.

McCain innocently protested that they had no control over fellow Republicans.

But Republicans face a structural problems that go beyond finance and have profound implications carrying well after election day.